The artist estate of Stuart Shedletsky

About

Stuart Shedletsky was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1944. He studied at the Parsons School of Design and the University of New Mexico before receiving his M.F.A. from Yale University. He spent many years teaching drawing and painting at Parsons School of Design.

Shedletsky’s early work consisted of disciplined yet sensual geometric paintings. In comparison, the paintings of his later years are spontaneous and painterly, charged with a symbolic figuration.

Adapted from Alejandro Anreus, Curator of Collections and Exhibitions at the Montclair Art Museum, in Montclair, New Jersey

Shedletsky passed away in 2006. His estate is currently maintained and managed by the Brooklyn Artists Gym.

All work shared on this site is for sale by the Brooklyn Artists Gym. For more information about works, please contact us at: (718) 858 9069

Images of Stuart Shedletsky’s work is protected under a Creative Commons License.
Creative Commons License

6 responses

  1. Pingback: Next Question: Is Art Dead? | In Terms Of

  2. Anonymous

    http://kingarthur58.blogspot.com/2013/09/art-prints_8.html?view=mosaic I took Stewarts life drawing class in 1970 my foundation year at Parsons.

    September 12, 2015 at 12:43 pm

  3. http://kingarthur58.blogspot.com/2013/09/art-prints_8.html?view=mosaic I took Stewarts life drawing class in 1970 my foundation year at Parsons.
    Arthur John Williamson

    September 12, 2015 at 12:46 pm

  4. Stuart and I graduated from the High School of Art and Design and went on to Parsons School of Design (both on scholarship). We were students of John Kacere, Marty Cannon and Paul Brach who were both (also) teaching summer school at the University of New Mexico. They invited us to apply to the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. We both applied and accepted where I studied sculpture and Stuart painting at UNM. Stuart went on to Graduate School at Yale, I attended Hunter College in NYC (studying with Tony Smith and Robert Morris). We both married and settled in SOHO (before it became SOHO). Stuart was a good friend and I think about him often. I own a small work of his and it is by the side of my bed. I look at it everyday and think about him. He passed away too soon. I never got to say goodbye to him. When I last spoke to him he was already ill and trying to set up his cable TV. His wife Judith was caring for him, even though they had been separated for sometime. I miss him dearly. A great artist/painter who’s time came too soon.

    Joel Glassman 12/3/15

    December 3, 2015 at 4:09 pm

  5. Joan Rosenfelt

    I was in Stuart’s class at Parsons School of Design in the ’60’s. I didn’t know him well – but he was a really nice guy who was clearly so talented. At one point a friend of mine (Jean Claude van Itallie) was putting on an Off-Off-Broadway play and he needed some scenery painted. I offered to help but then realized the project required more expertise, so I asked Stu if he would like to help. He came for an afternoon and immediately knocked the scenery into shape with a strong concept and few quickly, but expertly, drawn lines. I ran into him once years later coming out of the New School in the Village – where I lived for many years – and we chatted briefly. He popped into my mind for some reason today and I decided to look him up as I figured he had to have had a significant career – and sure enough, he did. But how sad that he died too young. Very, very talented guy – and really nice. I also remember classes with Paul Brach – an extraordinary teacher of art history at Parsons. My friend Jennifer Berne and I loved his classes – they were so smart and witty and full of wonderful anecdotes and observations. I wish they had been recorded! I’d love to hear those lectures now. I ran into him, also, on the streets of the Village – in the late 80’s – and I got a chance to tell him how wonderful his classes were and how I remembered them with such admiration.
    Joan Rosenfelt – Pond Eddy, NY 12770 – February 12th, 2016.

    February 12, 2016 at 1:13 pm

  6. He was a good friend, a brilliant artist and a great teacher! He past on too soon.
    Joel Glassman

    February 12, 2016 at 4:08 pm

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